In Lawsuit Over Allegedly Defective Baccarat Cards, Casino’s Damages Capped At Little More Than One Green Chip

by: Peter J. Gallagher (@pjsgallagher) (LinkedIn)

Chips (pd)The running battle between the Borgata and world renowned poker player Phil Ivey (among others) continues, and, fortunately, continues to be interesting. As I wrote about here and here, the Borgata sued Ivey and an associate, Cheng Yin Sun, after the two men won more than $9.6 million playing Baccarat at the casino. The Borgata claimed that the two men used an impermissible "edge sorting" scheme  to win the money, and therefore breached their implicit contract with the casino to abide by the terms of the Casino Control Act. The scheme relied, in part on an alleged defect in the playing cards, which Ivey and Sun knew about and exploited. The Third Circuit described it as follows:

The scheme is called "edge sorting," where Sun would identify minute asymmetries on the repeating diamond pattern on the backs of the playing cards to identify certain cards' values, and would have the dealer turn those strategically important cards so that they could be distinguished from all other cards in the deck. Ivey and Sun would then be able to see the leading edge of the first card in the shoe before it was dealt, giving them 'first card knowledge,' and Ivey would bet accordingly.

The Borgata successfully moved for summary judgment against Ivey and Sun, and was awarded more than $10 million in damages.

In addition to suing the players, the casino also sued the manufacturer of the cards that were used in the edge-sorting scheme. Both moved for summary judgment, and both motions were initially denied without prejudice. After the district court's decision on the casino's summary judgment motion against Ivey and Sun, both renewed their motions. The district court again denied both, but in doing so, threw cold water on the casino's claims against the manufacturer, including holding that the most the casino could recover against the manufacturer was $26.88, the cost of the allegedly defective cards.

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Phil Ivey Ordered to pay Borgata $10 million (presumably not in chips) for “Edge-Sorting” Scheme

 by:  Peter J. Gallagher (@pjsgallagher) (LinkedIn)

Chips and cardsA few weeks back, I wrote a post about a lawsuit between the Borgata Casino and world renowned poker player and gambler, Phil Ivey. In the lawsuit, the Borgata accused Ivey and a partner, Cheng Yin Sun, of engaging in an "edge sorting" scheme, which allowed them to shift the odds of Baccarat in their favor and win more than $9.6 million over several visits to the casino. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit described their actions as follows:

The scheme is called "edge sorting," where Sun would identify minute asymmetries on the repeating diamond pattern on the backs of the playing cards to identify certain cards' values, and would have the dealer turn those strategically important cards so that they could be distinguished from all other cards in the deck. Ivey and Sun would then be able to see the leading edge of the first card in the shoe before it was dealt, giving them 'first card knowledge,' and Ivey would bet accordingly.

The Borgata successful moved for summary judgment against both men. It held that casinos and players enter into an implicit contract to, among other things, abide by New Jersey's Casino Control Act ("CCA"). The court determined that, by employing the edge-sorting scheme, Ivey and Sun were using marked cards to play the game, which is prohibited by the CCA. As a result, they breached their contract with the casino. After finding in the casino's favor on liability, the court ordered supplemental briefing on damages. After considering those briefs, the court awarded the casino $10,130,000.

The court held that the appropriate method to assess damages was to restore the status quo ante — i.e., to return the parties to their positions prior to the formation of the contract. It held that Ivey's and Sun's use of marked cards violated the CCA and voided the contract between them and the casino. Because the contracts were void, restoring the parties to their pre-contract position was the appropriate remedy. The casino was, therefore, entitled to the return of all of Ivey's winnings, including the money he won playing craps because "those winnings were directly traceable to his prior Baccarat winnings — i.e., he used Baccarat winnings to play craps."

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On a warm summer’s evenin’, on a train bound for nowhere . . . is a dispute over insuring a stranger’s life

 by:  Peter J. Gallagher (@pjsgallagher) (LinkedIn)

Gambling

I know it is a little obvious, but I couldn't write a post about gambling without using lyrics from "The Gambler." Fortunately, the case this post discusses — Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada v. U.S. Bank National Association — is anything but obvious. Sun Life involved gambling on another person's life but not in a Deer Hunter, Russian roulette kind of way. In Sun Life, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit addressed the enforceability of an insurance policy that insured a stranger's life.

In Sun Life, Judge Posner began his decision by discussing the common law principle that "forbids a person to own an insurance policy that insures someone else's life unless the policy owner has an insurable interest in that life." A wife can have an insurable interest in her husband's or children's lives, a creditor can have an insurable interest in a debtor's life, but "you cannot own an insurance policy on the life of a stranger who you happen to know is in poor health and likely to die soon." The reason is that, by doing so, you are essentially gambling on another person's life, and gambling contracts are generally unenforceable as a matter of public policy. 

Continue reading “On a warm summer’s evenin’, on a train bound for nowhere . . . is a dispute over insuring a stranger’s life”