Is Your Driveway A Principal Use?

by:  Greg Ricciardi

According to the  New Jersey Supreme Court, in certain circumstances the answer is yes.  On June 16, 2011, the Court held that a driveway is a principal use where, pursuant to local zoning, the driveway does not meet the definition of an accessory use.  Moreover, depending on the circumstances, you may need difficult to obtain and costly variances to get your driveway approved.  How could this happen?

The answer lies in the curious case of Nuckey v. Borough of Little Ferry Planning Bd.  These are the facts. A developer owns multiple lots and wants to build a hotel.  One of the lots has no highway access. To remedy this issue, the developer proposes to build a driveway on an adjacent lot that would continue across the corner of another lot owned by the same principals as the developer.  This proposed driveway would provide the needed highway access for the hotel.  Sounds like a simple accessory use right? Herein lies the rub. 

 

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Sewer Service Stunting Growth

by:  Katharine A. Muscalino

If the economy and local land use regulations didn’t make development hard enough, some counties and municipalities have discovered the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s June 2009 Water Quality Management Rules as another technique to inhibit growth and property development in New Jersey. The Water Quality Management Rules require counties, and some municipalities, to closely examine sewer service within their borders, and limit expansion of that service when possible. Counties have applied the DEP’s rules to remove undeveloped properties from the sewer service areas in their wastewater management plans, and to limit demand from sewered properties to the gallonage they currently produce.

Holmdel has taken the Water Quality Management Rules a step farther in its attempts to limit the possibilities for the redevelopment of the Alcotel-Lucent corporate campus, by arguing that the campus should not only be limited to its existing gallonage, but that sewer service should be limited to the existing corporate buildings’ footprints. This limitation would not only cap the size of the future development and its sewer service demand, but would also significantly limit the potential for new uses, and particularly residential use, on the site. If Holmdel succeeds in this aggressive wastewater management planning, it will have serious ramifications for the future of the property and its marketability.

 

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